By Alan Dean Foster

PLAYTHING OF THE GODS

He was once Perseus, son of Zeus and Danae, born in shame, exiled to perish at sea, fated to outlive at heavenly caprice -- till he met his love, defied the Gods and dared to struggle them or die.

She used to be Andromeda, enslaved through her personal attractiveness which beggared the heavens and taken a curse upon her urban, her domestic, her heart....until Perseus accredited the Devil's personal problem, spoke back the lethal riddle and rode forth on his winged horse Pegasus to assert his love and to stand the final of the Titans, armed in basic terms with a bloody hand, a witche's curse, and a severed head...

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Clash of the Titans

PLAYTHING OF THE GODS

He was once Perseus, son of Zeus and Danae, born in shame, exiled to perish at sea, fated to outlive at heavenly caprice -- until eventually he met his love, defied the Gods and dared to struggle them or die.

She used to be Andromeda, enslaved through her personal attractiveness which beggared the heavens and taken a curse upon her urban, her domestic, her middle. .. .until Perseus accredited the Devil's personal problem, spoke back the lethal riddle and rode forth on his winged horse Pegasus to say his love and to stand the final of the Titans, armed in simple terms with a bloody hand, a witche's curse, and a severed head. ..

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Extra resources for Clash of the Titans

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The myths help you read the messages. They tell you the typical probabilities. MOYERS: Give me an example. CAMPBELL: One thing that comes out in myths, for example, is that at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light. " You're saying that myths have brought this consciousness to you. CAMPBELL: I live with these myths, and they tell me this all the time. This is the problem that can be metaphorically understood as identifying with the Christ in you.

Then comes the horrific stage of getting born, the difficult passage through the birth canal, and then -- my God, light! Can you imagine! Isn't it amazing that this repeats just what the myth says -- that Self said, "I am," and immediately felt fear? And then when it realized it was alone, it felt desire for another and became two. That is the breaking into the world of light and the pairs of opposites. MOYERS: What does it say about what all of us have in common that so many of these stories contain similar elements -- the forbidden fruit, the woman?

The serpent bound to the earth, the eagle in spiritual flight -- isn't that conflict something we all experience? And then, when the two amalgamate, we get a wonderful dragon, a serpent with wings. All over the earth people recognize these images. Whether I'm reading Polynesian or Iroquois or Egyptian myths, the images are the same, and they are talking about the same problems. MOYERS: They just wear different costumes when they appear at different times? CAMPBELL: Yes. It's as though the same play were taken from one place to another, and at each place the local players put on local costumes and enact the same old play.

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