By Naomi Novik

"A correct series."
--Anne McCaffrey

"Naomi Novik has performed for the Napoleonic Wars what Anne McCaffrey did for technology fiction: developed an alternative fact in which dragons are genuine in a saga that's impressively unique, absolutely built, and peopled with characters you care about."
--David Weber, writer of the dignity Harrington series

After their fateful experience in China, Capt. Will Laurence of His Majesty' s Aerial Corps and his outstanding dragon, Temeraire, are waylaid via a mysterious envoy bearing pressing new orders from Britain. 3 necessary dragon eggs were bought from the Ottoman Empire, and Laurence and Temeraire needs to detour to Istanbul to escort the dear shipment again to England. Time is of the essence if the eggs are to be borne domestic prior to hatching.

but catastrophe threatens the venture at each turn--thanks to the diabolical machinations of the chinese language dragon Lien, who blames Temeraire for her master's loss of life and vows to best friend herself with Napoleon and take vengeance. Then, confronted with shattering betrayal in an unforeseen position, Laurence, Temeraire, and their squad needs to release a bold offensive. yet what probability do they have opposed to the massed forces of Bonaparte's implacable army?

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Additional resources for Black Powder War (Temeraire, Book 3)

Sample text

Some 9,600 men stood ready to fight and die for King Henry of England, during the crown’s ongoing struggle for control of France. With the help of longbows, the English won a resounding victory, against all the odds. However, at this point comparisons with the Battle of Agincourt end. The king in question was not Henry V, but his two-year-old son Henry VI and the year was not 1415, but 1424. The battlefield itself was near a town called Verneuil, Normandy, and the English commander was Henry V’s younger brother John, Duke of Bedford.

The king in question was not Henry V, but his two-year-old son Henry VI and the year was not 1415, but 1424. The battlefield itself was near a town called Verneuil, Normandy, and the English commander was Henry V’s younger brother John, Duke of Bedford. His tremendous victory at Verneuil was soon dubbed by contemporaries as ‘The Second Agincourt’. Bedford is an overlooked figure today, but he was a talented general and politician who successfully continued the English conquest of France during the latter part of the Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453) after the premature death of his older brother in 1422.

The renowned Chasseurs d’Afrique had formed in the protection of narrow ravines hidden from enemy sight. As they crested the ridge, the horsemen increased their pace to a full gallop, thundering towards Prussian skirmish lines. The skirmishers raised their weapons to ward off the blows, but many of the slashing sabres left gaping wounds in the vulnerable rank. The main line of Prussian infantry held its fire until the cavalry were within 200 yards, and then fired in unison. “There came out the whiff and roll of a volley, which was kept up like the rattling of [a giant pinwheel],” wrote war correspondent William H Russell.

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